Get Out and Vote!

Brothers,

Next Tuesday we get to exercise our right to vote.  While as an organization the Knights of Columbus do not endorse any particular candidates or political party(s), please remember that who and what you vote for should be informed by our Faith, and the tenets of our core beliefs, one of which is our belief in the sanctity of life.  Please do your homework to determine which candidates best represent our beliefs and vote your conscience.

Please make sure you do vote, and as you enter the sanctity of the voting booth carry these words with you:

"Let each citizen remember at the moment he is offering his vote that he is not making a present or a compliment to please an individual — or at least that he ought not so to do; but that he is executing one of the most solemn trusts in human society for which he is accountable to God and his country." –Samuel Adams (1781)

 

Thank you and God Bless.

Happy Birthday to All

Brothers,

A Happy Birthday to all our fellow Knights who will soon be celebrating birthdays:

James A Bishop 1-Nov
Peter G Dillman 6-Nov
Robert J Shaffery 6-Nov
Phillip M Pron 10-Nov
John A Angelo 11-Nov
Michael A Sarno 11-Nov
Alejandro Hernandez 15-Nov
Joseph E Fekete 19-Nov
Harry L Gano Jr 19-Nov
Paul T Garcia 20-Nov
Bernard Lettieri 21-Nov
Thomas F Dwyer 22-Nov
Stephen J Mallia 22-Nov
Victor Castello 23-Nov
Jon J Lapinski 23-Nov
Robert A Setzer Sr 23-Nov
Peter J Lisi 25-Nov
Anthony J Petto 27-Nov
Ed Pictroski 30-Nov

Knights of Columbus
Jubillee Council #3294

Support The Vote Against Bill A2270

Brother Knights,

We know that only God has the authority to give or take life.

The NJ “Aid in Dying” bill is a grave affront to God’s supreme authority. Bill A2270 is again to be on schedule for a vote this fall, so please continue to contact your legislators and tell them to Vote No. Go to this page and use the “Click here” link at the bottom. Make the quick, easy phone calls to your NJ Assembly rep’s. http://njrtl.org/op-ed-aid-in-dying-bill-riddled-with-flaws/

The director of NJ Right to Life states, “In reality, the “Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act” is riddled with loopholes and contradictions that place the lives of the very people it purports to empower at grave risk of abuse and coercion.”

Assisted suicide, renamed “death with dignity,” and “aid in dying,” all are murder – a human being is taking a human life, even if it is his own.

On Oct.22, we will celebrate the first Feast Day of St. John Paul the Great since he was declared a Saint this spring. Let us follow the example of our former Pope John Paul II who accepted his sufferings with grace, as part of God’s Master Plan for his life. We never know what graces and relief of Purgatorial time are gained through the sufferings of illness or aging, united to the suffering of our Lord.

Respect Life – from Conception to Natural Death!

Knights of Columbus
Jubillee Council #3294

Typhoon victims in the Philippines regain hope and employment through the Order’s Livelihood Project

By Brian Caufield

With an innovative program based on neighbor helping neighbor, the Knights of Columbus is helping people in the Philippines get back to work after the devastating effects of Typhoon Haiyan. When the storm swept through the central portion of the archipelago in November 2013, more than 6,000 people were killed and millions more were forced to flee their homes.

Under the Knights of Columbus Livelihood Project, sponsored by the Supreme Council, laborers who lost their businesses due to the storm are being paid to construct motorized boats for fishermen whose vessels and equipment were washed away by the 195-mph winds and 20-foot storm surges. The first boats were delivered in late March, and periodic deliveries since then will bring the total number of boats to more than 100 by the end of the summer. Along with the boats, the fishermen receive fishing gear such as nets, hooks, lures, nylon string and heavy-duty rope.

The Livelihood Project also includes the delivery of seeds to farmers whose topsoil was washed away by the floods and whose land was covered by toppled trees. With financial assistance from the Supreme Council, local Knights purchased and distributed 10,000 coconut seedlings to help farmers replant and provided chainsaws so that they could clear their land of trees, which could also be used for wood to rebuild their homes.

Continue reading Typhoon victims in the Philippines regain hope and employment through the Order’s Livelihood Project

October Birthdays

The Council would like to wish the following Knights a Happy Birthday this month.

 

Richard Casey

Fernando Ydoate

William Kistner

Thomas Oven

David Ebel

Pierre Bonura

James Vargas

Arthur Astorino

Paul Nosal

Lucas Miller

Joseph Casey

Craig O’Brien

Gil Ricardo Jr.

Paul Montera

Rocco Colantuono

John Pamula

Felipe Botero

Peter Crisafulli

Raymond Perrotti

Public Prayer Rally Against the Black Mass

TFP prayer rally of reparation against the satanic Black Mass at the Oklahoma Civic Center on September 21, 2014.

 

Clay Christensen on Religious Freedom

Clay Christensen on Religious Freedom as an integral part of a functioning democracy.

Faustina: Messenger of Divine Mercy

EVENT: Faustina: Messenger of Divine Mercy, the live theatrical one-woman drama performed by actress Maria Vargo and directed by Leonardo Defilippis of Saint Luke Productions, will be presented at St. Magdalen de Pazzi Church in Flemington.

 

DETAILS: Wednesday, September 10 @ 7:00 p.m., at St. Magdalen de Pazzi Church in Flemington. Admission is $10.00. Doors will open at 6:15pm and following the drama there will be a light reception.

 

ABOUT THE PRODUCTION: In Faustina: Messenger of Divine Mercy, audiences experience firsthand the spirit and life of Polish mystic Saint Faustina, whose personal encounters with Jesus have inspired a world-wide devotion to Christ’s Divine Mercy. A parallel modern story within the drama offers audiences a compelling personal connection to the current moral issues of our times. Audiences are calling the production a “wake-up call.”

 

Faustina: Messenger of Divine Mercyis an inspiring dramatic portrayal not to be missed. The production runs ninety minutes, and is suitable for ages 13 and up.

 

ABOUT FAUSTINA KOWALSKA: She was born Helena Kowalska in 1905, into a large peasant family in Poland. She really had no potential for greatness – a poor girl, destined to be a housekeeper, with no education or prospects. Yet she longed for God, and despite the protests of her parents, and after a vision of Jesus telling her to head for Warsaw and become a nun, she secretly hopped on a train. Upon reaching the city, she knocked on the doors of convents until The Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy finally took a chance on this young girl, and let her in. As a nun she took the name Sister Maria Faustina, and spent the rest of her life doing menial work as a cook and as a gardener.

 

In 1930, the mystical visions started for the young nun, Sister Faustina Kowalska. Jesus appeared to her in a white garment, with rays of white and red light emanating from near His heart. He asked her to paint His image, with the message, “Jesus, I trust in You” across the bottom. That was the beginning of a very special mission that took years to develop into a powerful devotion for the Church – the Divine Mercy.

 

Jesus continued to speak through Sister Faustina, with an urgent message for our times, and He gave her a special prayer, the Divine Mercy Chaplet, which spread throughout the world like wildfire. Faustina continued to keep a diary of her visions, until she died of tuberculosis in 1938.

 

It was Pope John Paul II who declared the Sunday after Easter as Mercy Sunday, and in April 2000, Faustina Kowalska was declared the first saint of the 21st Century.

 

ABOUT THE ACTRESS: Maria Vargo is a Hollywood-based actress and a member of the Screen Actors Guild- American Federation of Television & Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA), Actors’ Equity, and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

 

Vargo brings a wealth of experience in theater and film to the role of FAUSTINA.   Her résumé includes numerous roles in film, television, and theater, in addition to work as an artistic director and producer. Aside from her work on stage and screen, Maria Vargo’s many talents encompass a far-reaching spectrum from singer, songwriter to voice teacher for actors. She looks forward to sharing the message of God’s endless mercy with the world, since she has experienced His mercy in her own life.

 

Tickets & Information: Tickets can be reserved online at www.stmagdalen.org or will be sold at all the Masses on the weekends of Aug 30 & 31 and Sept 6 & 7. 

 

Trailer of Play:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILoQzD8-GQM&list=PLvWbBflqK9kpG2XleVIq5gzCzuZYEmr9n

Upcoming Birthdays This Month

Fellow Knights,

We have a number of brothers who are celebrating birthdays this month – we wish you a very happy and rewarding day of celebration.

September Birthdays

DONALD             

A                  

ASSMANN                                

JERRY              

PAUL               

BONURA                                 

CHRISTOPHER        

                    

DANE                                    

FRANK              

H                  

DREHER                                 

DAVID              

L                  

FERRER                                 

GARY               

R                  

MALGIERI                               

ANTHONY            

S                  

MENNITO                                

MICHAEL            

G                  

PAGANO                                 

LAWRENCE           

G                   

PALKO                                  

ROY                

                    

RABINOWITZ                             

JOHN               

P                  

RUDKO                                  

ROBERT             

A                   

SETZER                                 

LAWRENCE           

T                  

SIVILLI                                

WILLIAM            

E                  

TOOLAN                                 

DANIEL              

J                  

WENE                                   

Knights of Columbus

Jubillee Council #3294

Slain Journalist James Foley on Praying the Rosary in Captivity

 

Slain journalist James Foley on praying the rosary in captivity

August 20, 2014 08:45 EST

By Catherine Harmon

http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Content/Site140/Blog/3321jamesfoleyj_00000002590.jpg

James Foley in Aleppo in 2012.

The news broke late yesterday that Islamic State jihadists executed freelance journalist James Foley and posted a video of his beheading. Foley, 40, had been missing for two years while covering the conflict in Syria. I am not going to link to the video or include screen shots from it, but I will share another link that has been circulating since the news of Foley’s brutal death: an article he wrote for the alumni magazine of Marquette University, his alma mater. The piece is about the time Foley spent imprisoned in Libya in 2011: 

I began to pray the rosary. It was what my mother and grandmother would have prayed. 
I said 10 Hail Marys between each Our Father. It took a long time, almost an hour to count 100 Hail Marys off on my knuckles. And it helped to keep my mind focused.

Clare and I prayed together out loud. It felt energizing to speak our weaknesses and hopes together, as if in a conversation with God, rather than silently and alone. …

One night, 18 days into our captivity, some guards brought me out of the cell. … Upstairs in the warden’s office, a distinguished man in a suit stood and said, “We felt you might want to call your families.”

I said a final prayer and dialed the number. My mom answered the phone. “Mom, Mom, it’s me, Jim.”

“Jimmy, where are you?”

“I’m still in Libya, Mom. I’m sorry about this. So sorry.” …

“They’re having a prayer vigil for you at Marquette. Don’t you feel our prayers?” she asked.

“I do, Mom, I feel them,” and I thought about this for a second. Maybe it was others’ prayers strengthening me, keeping me afloat.

The official made a motion. I started to say goodbye. Mom started to cry. “Mom, I’m strong. I’m OK. I should be home by Katie’s graduation,” which was a month away.

“We love you, Jim!” she said. Then I hung up.

I replayed that call hundreds of times in my head — my mother’s voice, the names of my friends, her knowledge of our situation, her absolute belief in the power of prayer. She told me my friends had gathered to do anything they could to help. I knew I wasn’t alone.

My last night in Tripoli, I had my first Internet connection in 44 days and was able to listen to a speech Tom Durkin gave for me at the Marquette vigil. To a church full of friends, alums, priests, students and faculty, I watched the best speech a brother could give for another. It felt like a best man speech and a eulogy in one. It showed tremendous heart and was just a glimpse of the efforts and prayers people were pouring forth. If nothing else, prayer was the glue that enabled my freedom, an inner freedom first and later the miracle of being released during a war in which the regime had no real incentive to free us. It didn’t make sense, but faith did.